Interview with Film Critic Candice Frederick

“...I noticed that my voice was missing from what I read. I was not represented in the conversation, so I decided to insert myself in the conversation.”
— Candice Frederick

Candice Frederick is a freelance film critic who has written for Harpers Bazzar, Vice, Slash, Thrillist, Birth.Death.Movie, Broadly, The Mary Sue, Mic, The Daily Beast and many more.

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Why do different critical voices matter?

Diverse voices matter so that artists in the industry can absorb a variety of responses about film that could inform their work in a more fully dimensional way. Audiences deserve to read criticism that reflects the world that they live in--which can only be encompassed by a fuller representation of voices. As for the film criticism industry, critics from all backgrounds deserve a voice in the often congested and very cliquey world of critical analysis--just like any professional industry. That said, homogenous analysis is often bland and does not represent the full of opinions about film. It's about inclusivity. 

What inspired you to be a critic?

I have a journalism degree and have always been a writer for nearly two decades now. I was inspired to become a critic because I read a lot of articles from a lot of journalists I respect, and I noticed that my voice was missing from what I read. I was not represented in the conversation, so I decided to insert myself in the conversation. Further, I wanted to start a conversation that I wasn't reading about. 

What films are you excited about right now?

Mudbound is such an astounding work of art that makes me excited for both black women filmmakers as well as non-traditional platforms that are defying the confines by which they have become known. Get Out reminds people that great horror has always been about inspiring social consciousness. I, Tonya makes me excited about more messy, female underdog stories that rub people the wrong way. I love that. 

What “hidden gem” do you think deserves more attention? 

Mother and Child. It is so quiet, romantic, and poignant all at once. 

  Film On Repeat    Clueless (1995) Directed by  Amy Heckerling

Film On Repeat
Clueless (1995) Directed by Amy Heckerling

  First Date Film   Rec 3: Genesis  (2012) Directed by Paco Plaza

First Date Film
Rec 3: Genesis (2012) Directed by Paco Plaza

  Hot and Bothered Film    Unfaithful (2002) Directed by  Adrian Lyne

Hot and Bothered Film
Unfaithful (2002) Directed by Adrian Lyne

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